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How have decentralised natural resource management institutions evolved over 20 years? Summary of findings from Mali, Niger, Sudan and Ethiopia

Working paper, 28 pages
17763IIED
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Two decades ago, legal provisions gave local institutions rights to manage natural resources in four dryland African countries: Mali, Niger, Sudan and Ethiopia. This report examines how resilient such decentralised institutions have been, under the rapidly changing circumstances of the past two decades, and notes common lessons learned.

These include:

  • Local management rights remain largely unsupported by government
  • The state has further complicated land management challenges by allocating large holdings to investors.
  • Changing politics, insecurity, demographic shifts and climate have exacerbated stresses, many of which have distant root causes
  • Neighbouring conflicts have driven migration by people and animals
  • Increasing wealth inequalities and shifting livelihood strategies have eroded farming and herding communities’ common interests.
How to cite:
Toulmin, C., Dembélé, P., Diakité, M., Gana, D., Haroun, S., Khatir, A., Sani, M., Vogt, K., Yacob, A. (2022). How have decentralised natural resource management institutions evolved over 20 years? Summary of findings from Mali, Niger, Sudan and Ethiopia.
  • IIED, London

https://pubs.iied.org/17763iied
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ISBN:
9781784318277
Product code:
17763IIED