Adapting agriculture with traditional knowledge

Over the coming decades, climate change is likely to pose a major challenge to agriculture; temperatures are rising, rainfall is becoming more variable and extreme weather is becoming a more common event. Researchers and policymakers agree that adapting agriculture to these impacts is a priority for ensuring future food security. Strategies to achieve that in practice tend to focus on modern science. But evidence, both old and new, suggests that the traditional knowledge and crop varieties of indigenous peoples and local communities could prove even more important in adapting agriculture to climate change. Follow the links below for more about our work on Biocultural heritage.
 
IIED code:
17111IIED 
Published:
Oct 2011 - IIED 
Areas:
Bolivia, China, Kenya 
Keywords:
Agriculture, Climate change 
Details:
4 pages (Briefing) 
Language:
English - also in Chinese (traditional and modern)  
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